Where the Past Is Present… Where the Arts Are Alive

Evening with an Expert – Battle Town

This past fall, FAMCC’s Evening with an Expert lecture series focused on Fredericksburg as a battle town during the Civil War. The series featured three prominent local Civil War historians exploring how the Civil War affected the region from secession to the Battle of Fredericksburg. Here are recordings of the lectures.

Dr. Jeffrey W. McClurken
Chair and Associate Professor of History and American studies at the University of Mary Washington

His lecture entitled, Leading Up to the Battle of Fredericksburg: National and Local Perspectives, explores the national-level political situation for the Union and Confederacy and local perceptions in the months leading up to Battle of Fredericksburg.  The voices of politicians, generals, journalists, and average Virginians will set the stage for Fredericksburg becoming the focal point for the December 1862 battle.

Leading up to the Battle of Fredericksburg: National and Local Perspectives,

John Hennessy
Chief Historian, Fredericksburg & Spotsylvania National Military Park

Explores the days and months following the Battle of Fredericksburg–the ordeal of the wounded and the struggle of a community damaged both physically and emotionally to recover in his lecture entitled, After the Guns: The Aftermath of Fredericksburg.

After the Guns: The Aftermath of Fredericksburg,

Frank O’Reilly
Historian, Fredericksburg & Spotsylvania National Military Park

Considered to be one of the premier historians of the battle, his lecture, War Comes to Fredericksburg explores the Battle of Fredericksburg from the prospective of the soldiers who fought during the battle and the citizens who witnessed it. Frank O’Reilly remarks, “In 1862, Fredericksburg witnessed the gathering of thousands of soldiers from every corner of the Union and Confederacy—who fought and died in a strange land along the Rappahannock River.  Thousands of these soldiers fell transforming Fredericksburg’s backyards into battlefields—and making an indelible mark in the nation’s history.”

War Comes to Fredericksburg,